The long hair and beard could persist into 2017. Here's why.

4 reasons the shaggy look is still in

It's tough to keep up with the changing world of men's styles. In the past few years, it's no secret that longer hair and full beards have become something of a hot item. But more recently, some have suggested that these trends are getting ready to go the way of leg warmers, long sideburns and other anachronisms.

Good news for the long hair-lovers out there: Long hair and matching beards could still be around for a while. This could be a good tip if you'd like to keep things teased out and luscious in the coming year.

Want proof? Here's a few signs that longer locks are still appealing:

  • Celebrities are still doing it: Business Insider recently documented the vast amount of beards on display at the recent Golden Globes ceremony, and was forced to take back its prediction that the beard would die last year. What's notable is that the pictures provided with the source span a range of actors of different ages, from Donald Glover and Ryan Gosling to elder statesmen of Hollywood like Jeff Bridges. Styles on display also range, too, and Bridges' look in particular combines a rich beard with swept-back hair in a way that makes use of the silver coloring. All of which is to say, should you choose to keep your hair grown out, you'll be in good company for the foreseeable future.
  • It's a good alternative to possibly less attractive styles: If you don't want to settle for other options but still want to show off your hair, simply letting it grow long could be the right call. It also give you the chance to restyle it, since you'll have more hair to work with than you would otherwise. If you enjoy staying versatile, this could be a nice fit for you.
  • Shaving club revenue has grown: Internet-based "shave clubs" can prompt creative beard styling, not just a completely clean face. Last year, Euromonitor reported that the Dollar Shave Club generated $153 million, more than double the amount of the previous year. In addition to financial progress, these businesses can also help encourage a sort of beard culture, that gets men excited about their facial hair. 
  • There's a community around it: A couple of years ago, Slate delved into the perks of having long hair for men, according to the self-styled "longhair" Jason Bartlett. Bartlett described having long hair as joining a community, specifically mentioning the way men in the group could share ideas and tips with each other. As such, you can think of growing hair out as a chance to offer something to others in addition to changing your own style. That could be a neat way to explore your new look and also distinguish it from other hairstyle changes.

Obviously, this isn't going to be the style for everyone, but it at least seems to be a possibility for anyone still interested and able. Contact Dr. Marotta for information on the latest hair restoration treatments, or click the banner below to find out more.